TEAC - Test of English for Aeronautical Communication

Creating Confidence for Aviation Professionals


What is TEAC?

The Test of English for Aeronautical Communication (TEAC) is a plain English for Aviation language testing system designed to assess the English language proficiency (ELP) of aviation personnel for ICAO Language Proficiency Requirements compliance.

The TEAC is a human interaction test between 1 candidate and 1 examiner, and takes approximately 30 minutes.

Test tasks are focussed as much as possible on contexts relevant to a candidate's aviation role and experience. It is not a test of operational knowledge, but operational contexts and technical references are used to make sure that the ELP being assessed is appropriate.

Tests are produced with aviation professional input, and performances are assessed by 1 aviation professional and 1 language expert

Why choose TEAC?

Versions

Different versions for different aviation roles and test content is specific to the role of the candidate. Versions are numerous, standardised and updated frequently.

Interactivity

TEAC is highly interactive, meaning candidates are challenged to demonstrate their ability to communicate effectively and spontaneously in a rapid-pace human interaction.

Validity

All parts of the test, including the listening sections, are contextualised and authentic to the role of the candidate.  There is an RT dialogue task enabling a deeper assessment of Comprehension skills. Subject matter experts are involved in the assessment.

Reliability

The team all have a Masters in Language Testing: as the test trialling process continues, appropriate measures of research and analysis will be implemented to maximise score reliability.

What do you do in TEAC?

Part 1 - Image Interview (5-7 minutes)

After a brief introduction, you will be shown an image of something significant to your aviation work/experience to use as a platform for related questions about routine and non-routine activity. There are no right or wrong answers – you should show you understand the questions by responding to them directly and fully. The examiner will ask you further questions, to encourage you to talk more about some of the things you mention in your responses.

Part 2 - Explaining an RT Communication

You will hear an extended RT (radiotelephony) communication between a pilot and a controller. You will hear the recording only once and it cannot be repeated. The communication will be played in 2 sections. After listening to the first section, you will be asked to describe the communications between the pilot and the ATC, and the unexpected information reported. You should make notes to help you to explain the exchanges in as much detail as possible.


Before you hear the second section of the communication, you will be asked to predict/speculate what will happen next. Then, you will listen to the last section of the communication, and you should make notes to help you to explain the exchanges in as much detail as possible.

Part 3 - Reporting Pilot/Controller Messages 

You will hear 3 sets of 3 messages from international pilots or controllers related to non-routine situations. Each set is connected to a different aviation topic. After every recording, you need to report your fullest understanding of the message. As you listen, you can make notes to help you summarise the content in as much detail as possible. You will hear each recording once only unless you ask for it to be repeated once more.

Part 4 - Picture Description and Discussion - (9-10 minutes)

You will be given 2 pictures on a related aviation topic to describe and compare. You will be shown the first picture and asked to describe it, and you will be given 30 seconds to speak. You will then be shown a second picture and asked some questions about it.  Finally, you will be asked some questions about both pictures.

You will then take part in an interactive discussion of general aviation topics related to the pictures, and how aviation affects the wider world.  The examiner will discuss these topics with you to allow you to show your ability to give opinions, speculate about the future and justify your ideas. 

Example TEAC for Airline Pilots

Test Versions

There are different test versions depending on the candidate’s aviation role/experience. Overall, the test is the same - and the certificate will not state which version was taken - but each version’s content is adapted for the comfort of the candidate and to provide a fair opportunity to complete tasks related to their specific role in aviation. Test audio recordings for different test versions consider the most suitable aircraft operations, airport size, call signs, phases of flight, and the operational responsibilities of each role. Tasks are not designed to evaluate technical knowledge of operations in that role. The assessment criteria remain the same throughout.

At the point of registration, candidates should choose the most appropriate version based on the short descriptions below:

Airline Pilot

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their job and their flight operations with crews and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve big airports and commercial/private passenger aircraft and communications with ground/tower, approach and area controllers.

Ab-Initio Pilot

The context of tasks is ‘general aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their training/flying and flight operations/connections with aviation personnel; contexts may involve smaller aerodromes/airports, lighter aircraft and communications with ground/tower, approach and area controllers. It is recommended that student pilots take this version once they have completed ground school.

Aerodrome Controller

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their job and their ATC operations with pilots, colleagues and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve big airports and commercial/private passenger aircraft and communications with aircrafts during the ground, take-off or landing phases.

Area Controller

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their job and their ATC operations with pilots, colleagues and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve commercial/private passenger aircraft and communications with aircrafts during the cruise phase.

FISO / AFISO

The context of tasks is mostly ‘general aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their role and their FIS operations with pilots and other aviation personnel; contexts involve smaller aerodromes, lighter aircraft in general, and communications with recreational or commercial pilots.

Private Pilot

The context of tasks is ‘general aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their recreational flying and flight operations/connections with aviation personnel; contexts may involve smaller aerodromes/airports, lighter aircraft and communications with ground/tower, approach and area controllers.

Rotary-Wing Pilot

The context of tasks is mostly ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their helicopter flying and their operations with crews and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve big airports or smaller aerodromes, and communications between pilots of commercial/private aircraft and ground/tower controllers in the vicinity.

Approach Controller

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their job and their ATC operations with pilots, colleagues and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve big airports and commercial/private passenger aircraft and communications with aircrafts during the climb or descent phases.

ATC Student

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their training/practice and ATC operations with pilots, colleagues and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve big airports and commercial/private passenger aircraft and communications with aircrafts during the ground, take-off or landing phases. It is recommended that ATC students take the test once they have covered their syllabus, potentially during their course review period or at the time of their final exams.

ADP Driver

The context of tasks is ‘commercial aviation’. Candidates will discuss aspects of their job at large airports and their operations/connections with ATC, colleagues and other aviation personnel; contexts may involve commercial or private passenger aircraft and their operations/communications during ground phases.

Interested in learning more?

Why not arrange for a test demonstration with one of our Examiners to get a feel for the TEAC?

More questions/Book a demonstration? Get in touch!